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Fraction Tower® Cubes
  • Fraction Tower® Cubes
  • Fraction Tower® Cubes
  • Fraction Tower® Cubes

Fraction Tower® Cubes

MM-LR-2510
R306.00 Save R34.00
R340.00
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An engaging, hands-on way to reinforce fractions. Help visualise and understand fractions concepts in different contexts with these colour-coded resources
Quantity
30 In Stock

An engaging, hands-on way to reinforce fractions at home and in the classroom! \n \nHelp students visualise and understand fractions concepts in different contexts with these colour-coded hands-on resources \n \nFraction Tower Cubes are tangible and can be manipulated by the child to “make sense” of what a fraction looks like. The Fraction Tower Cubes essentially helps children see visually what a fraction is, and how different sized fractions relate to one another. The children use the Fraction Tower Cubes to build visual mathematical models. This helps them to deepen their understanding of fractions, and the relationship different sized fractions have between each other. \n

Description of Fraction Tower Cubes

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  • Cubes are marked with respective fractions
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  • Covers fractions: one whole, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/8, 1/10 and 1/12
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  • One whole piece measures 12cm H
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  • Colour-coded for use with our other Rainbow Fraction such as Fraction Dominoes.
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Suggestions on how to use Fraction Tower Cubes

\nA certain amount of free play is always appropriate when introducing new materials. Children will make actual towers and patterns with them, arrange them by colour, arrange them by size etc., etc. You want them to be able to handle the materials comfortably. \n

Activities for the Fraction Tower Cubes

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Unit Fractions

\nThe red cube is equal to one whole unit. Compare the pink cube to the red cube. It takes two pink cubes to match the height of one red cube. The pink cubes thus have a value of one-half, as designated. Demonstrate that same-color cubes are equal in value. Continue comparing cubes to the \nunit. Discuss fraction relationships. Incorporate vocabulary terms such as part, whole, numerator, denominator, equal-sized parts, and unit fraction in your discussion. \n

Proper Fractions

\nShow students how to build same-color proper fractions. Demonstrate that 1/4 is made using one yellow cube, 2/4 is made using two yellow cubes, \nand 3/4 is made using three yellow cubes. Continue this activity by building various unit and proper fractions with denominators of 3, 4, 5, 6, \n8, 10, and 12. \n

Equivalent Fractions

\nMake two equivalent fractions such as 1/2 and 3/6 with your fraction cubes. Ask students to observe and compare the height of each fraction. Make another set of equivalent fractions and observe the heights. Challenge students to make another pair of equivalent fractions where the heights do not equal one another. (It’s impossible! Two fractions are equivalent only if they have the same height.) \n

Simplify Fractions

\nSimplify fractions to their lowest terms by finding equivalent fractions. The equivalent fraction that uses the fewest number of same-color cubes is in lowest terms. Build a fraction with four blue cubes. Ask students to name the fraction. Then, challenge them to make equivalent fractions using as few cubes as possible. Students should discover that although four blue cubes can be rebuilt using two yellow cubes, the fewest number of cubes is one pink cube. Therefore, 4/8 expressed in lowest terms is 1/2.
MM-LR-2510

Specific References